WILDLIFE AND BIRDING  (click on thumbnails)

          

  

Holiday self-catering accommodation in Cape Town CAMPSBAYGLEN simple rustic near beach on edge of nature reserve Glen.

Ideal for nature lovers travelling Cape Town South Africa

BOOKING CALENDAR & AVAILABILITY CAMPSBAYGLEN

Report on South Africa 23.ii.2010 – 10.iii.2010

Paul A. Brown.

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We decided that it was about time that we visited South Africa before the World Cup might raise the cost of everything! We decided to split the trip in two halves with a week at St Lucia, KwaZulu Natal, which is part of iSimangaliso Wetland Park, declared by UNESCO protocol in 1999 and is South Africa’s first and largest Natural World Heritage Site. This is in the North East corner of SA so has many, more tropical species occurring. The second half of the trip would be a visit to the Cape to see endemics and to try a pelagic boat trip out to the fishing grounds 30 miles south of Cape Point. We used the Southern African Bird finder by Cohan, Spottiswood, & Rossouw, 2006 which I heavily used and all the sites I visited are covered; and the id guides Kingdom, 2004. Pocket Guide to African Mammals; Newman, 2002. Birds of Southern Africa 8th edition, and Sinclair, Hockey & Tarboton, 2002 Birds of Southern Africa 3rd edition.

We used Emirates at £650 each return from Heathrow which was cheaper than direct flights and left at 10.30pm overnight by flight EK006 to Dubai and flight UK557 at 10.45am and arrived 5.40pm at Durban airport. We used ‘Firstcar’ and hired the cheapest vehicle available which was a Chevrolet Sprint at £162.50 for the week and driving was simple, being on the left. We did not have air conditioning which was a problem in Paarl when the temperature reached 40 degrees Centigrade. Most of the roads are well maintained, the only slightly rough road being to Mkuzi Park which had good roads, and some of the back tracks in Hluhluwe & Mfolozi Parks. The standard of driving was not good though! In the Capetown area, car-parking required a charge or tip of a few Rand for the official or unofficial attendant. We chose our stopover for the night at the convenient and attractive beachside Fairlight guest house www.wheretostay.co.za/fairlight, at 1 Margaret Bacon Avenue on the corner of South Beach Road, Umdoloti, just off the N2 main road north. We were also very lucky to choose two exceedingly suitable and wonderful self catering sites in, or close to bird rich habitat, yet also close to amenities, beaches, bars etc etc.

The St Lucia area only has the one proper tourist centre, that being St Lucia Estuary and there is no other town with any similar amenities yet with or close to, great birding and lots of, sometimes far too Big Game! We did not take malerial tablets although Maleria does occur endemically on the Mozambique border. Thanks very much to the owners of Sunset Lodge, Rodney & Shelley at www.sunsetstlucia.co.za which consists of self catering log cabins situated between McKenzie Street (the main street in St Lucia) and the banks of the bird rich St Lucia Estuary.  This cost a very reasonable £300. The gardens go down to the edge of the Estuary and has extensive views westwards over the water, so is good for scoping Goliath Heron etc. They are within easy walking distance of shops, restaurants and amenities and they have off street parking. They advertise the possibility of viewing animals such as Hippo, red duiker and bush buck, which can often be seen on the lawn [Yes we had the real first-hand experience!], and lourie and hornbills, of which there were two species each! Just a hundred metres south is the start of the famous Igwalawala Trail through the Dune-forest which leads round to the ski-boat club and the best site for scoping waders, water-birds, crocs & Hippos with a drink in hand and round to the blocked off estuary mouth and the beach. The St Lucia Park entrance is just a five minute drive north with the Lake St Lucia and Cape Vidal being essential to visit as are the game parks at Hluhluwe & Mfolozi (iMfolozi) are one hour’s drive and Mkuzi (uMkhuze) Park is two hours drive away.

We flew from Durban airport on South African Airways, flight SA617 at 2.05pm and arrived Capetown at 4.20pm for the equivalent of £60 and hired again the same ‘Firstcar’ Chevrolet Sprint in a tasteful green colour at the same £162.50 as before, but beware as we had to pay a charge of c. £20 for cleaning the car of sand and mud both times.

         

Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, Natal                    Sunset at Camps Bay Glen, Bakoven, Capetown

Thanks also go to the Owner of Camps Bay Glen, Bakoven, Mark Schlesinger and helpers Romiella Rex & Cathlene Kelbrick at www.campsbayglen.co.za which consists of three flats off Rottingdean Road, we choosing the middle sized studio B with shared swimming pool and views out to sea. This cost us £460 but we paid by an agent so go direct to their website to book! Camps Bay Glen is within easy walking distance of beaches, the Bank’s Cormorant breeding rocks, supermarket and restaurants and has off street parking. It is described as a peaceful, beautiful & quiet part of Camps Bay and is next to a stream flowing from Table Mountain which acts as a green corridor linking the garden with the Table Mountain Park. Bakoven is one of the most expensive and exclusive parts of Capetown so this relatively cheap yet bird friendly place, is a very good find. Not far away are the Cape of Good Hope Park, Boulders Beach for the easy to see penguin colony, Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, Strandfontein sewage works, Intaka Island, Rietvlei and Sir Lowry Pass. We found an extended street atlas of Capetown and environs very useful! We also drove North along the West coast to visit the West Coast National Park, Langebaan Lagoon which was well worth it!

I booked a pelagic trip with Capetown Pelagics at http://www.capetownpelagics.com/ but this was cancelled due to persistent strong south easterly winds and a lack of boats out fishing, so this was a great disappointment! This would have cost 1764 Rand inclusive of extras.

I did not feel unsafe anywhere in either location. St Lucia is accessible only by one bridge with a security point at the town side and it was reported that there is very little crime at all. In Capetown, we were more careful. One has to avoid making oneself an easy target, so advertising ones expensive optics is never a good idea (I keep mine in a beaten old bag or under a coat) but I always kept an eye open for any undue interest shown. I mostly birded alone and walked all over Sir Lowry’s Pass with nobody in sight and I drove around Strandfontein sewage works which was mostly empty of people apart from a few site workers, so again I felt no threat. We found that people were friendly ‘almost’ everywhere we went and we rose early and retired early so where not out late at night!

We flew back out from Capetown on Emirates flight EK771 at 6pm and again changed at Dubai with a 3 hour stop over and back to Heathrow on flight EK001 on their flagship double-decker Airbus A380!

THE DIARY

Tuesday 23 – Wednesday 24th February 2010

Flights from Heathrow overnight via Dubai by Emirates on Boeing 777 and airbus A330. We flew over the Horn of Africa and a very empty looking Somalia, around some massive thunderheads over Tanzania & Mozambique and heard later that there had been extreme weather conditions there. We arrived at 5.40pm at Durban airport and was surprised that the first bird seen was an African Marsh Harrier over the airfield! followed by a Black-necked Heron. Got through customs relatively quickly and picked up a Chevrolet Sprint from ‘Firstcar’ and drove (on the left!) north through Durban on the N2 through the dusk with flocks of ungainly Hadeda Ibis going to roost, an obvious Palm Nut Vulture, Kites and other indet birds too dark to see. North of Durban, we easily found the convenient Fairlight guest house at Umdoloti on the seafront. A short walk found the good but expensive El Punto restaurant for a langustine and cob fish meal. A Hemidactylus geco serenaded us on the balcony and a big surf was running from the south east.

Thursday 25th February 2010

Woke to the sound of more Hadeda Ibis and noisy Red-winged Starlings and Indian Miners. We had amazing views of sunrise over the sea from the balcony and a chance for first proper birding with a flock of House, White-rumped and African Palm Swifts mixing with many Barn Swallows (The commonest bird in South Africa!) and a few Lesser Striped Swallows. In the gardens were Red-eyed Doves calling “I am the red eyed dove”, Black-eyed Bulbul, Southern Grey-headed Sparrows and Fork-tailed Drongo. On the shore were Cape Wagtails, Cape and Grey-headed Gulls, a fishing White-breasted version of our Greater Cormorant and a Greenshank. After a good ‘English’ breakfast and a chat with our host, Bruce Deeb, we drove north along the N2 with many Yellow-billed Kites with quite a different colour scheme to black kite! a few troupes of roadside Vervet Monkeys and fields of sugarcane replaced later by stands of sterile Eucalyptus. After 2 hours, turned off east at Mtubatuba to St Lucia Estuary town and entered over the bridge which is the only route in and with a security station at the town end. Booking in at Sunset Lodge was immediately distracted by a singing Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird on a tall palm stump nearby, African Pied Wagtails on the roof and then a White-eared Barbet on the same stump! A quick explore of the grounds which go down to the estuary shore gave a beautiful African Golden Weaver sitting in the dead ‘bird’ tree on the lawn and distant Goliath Heron fishing and African Fish Eagles calling.

   

The Bird Tree, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia 1.iii.10                  Ski-boat Club, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10

After buying supplies of food, beer and wine at the local stores, we explored the beach loop road and stopped at Jabula Beach car-park where there was a tame Southern Black Flycatcher, a flock of noisy Blue-cheeked Bee-eaters and a tail-less male Pin-tailed Whydah practising a display dance! Found that the estuary had been totally blocked by sand on which were 4 White-fronted Plover and a Yellow-billed Stork. Back into town, noticed the first of many Red Forest Duiker in the large wooded gardens.  At Sunset Lodge again, I explored the gardens more closely, with Little Terns and Pied Kingfisher over the water and some very large footprints and droppings in the estuary mud, the home of many medium sized crabs. The dead tree sprouted a family party of eight Trumpeter Hornbills and a Brimstone Canary. Set up the back lawn ‘brai’ (B-B-Q) with a Canadian couple and after dark, huge shadows appeared and then showed in the garden green ark lights and came to within 10 metres of where we sat; three, for us, totally unexpected and nerve racking, Hippopotamus !

Friday 26th February 2010

Heavy rain and thunder in the night and still raining at dawn so sat undercover by the swimming pool and scoped the estuary with flocks of Sand Martins and White-winged Black Terns and a family group of 5 Crowned Hornbills joined me on the patio each with a huge longhorn beetle breakfast. In the dead ‘bird’ tree sat a very bedraggled Little Sparrowhawk with brilliant yellow eye and an African Green Pigeon with very noisy wing-beats! After sharing breakfast with the cats and Jack Russell Ben, we drove to the land-locked south end of the estuary and soon had the flock of Crested Guineafowl along the road and by the boat ramp heard and saw the first of many Thick Billed Weavers in the reeds. By the Ski-boat Club, a low waterlogged island had dozens of Hippos out of the water and a few Nile Crocodile, a row of Water Thick-knee, a family party of Egyptian Geese, a Great Crested and a few Caspian Terns, a pair of Blacksmith Plover, Wood, Common and Curlew Sandpipers, Ruff, Little Stint, Little Egret & Woolly-necked Stork and a bleating Green-backed Camaroptera complaining at my presence in the waterside bushes. We explored the car-park side bushes in the rain from the car and had good views of Speckled Mouse-bird, Southern Masked Weaver, Natal Robin-chat and the only Brown Scrub-robin of the trip. Here we found the troupe of Banded Mongoose or should the plural be Mongeese? Spent lunchtime at the Ski-boat Club veranda sipping Carling Black Label?! and scoping African Spoonbill, White-faced Tree-duck and a single Pink-backed Pelican. Inspected the huge Little Swift colony under the St Lucia Estuary Bridge with more Lesser Striped Swallows.

  

Greater Kudu, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10                               Giraffe, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10

As the weather was still cloudy, drove to the entrance gate to the St Lucia Park which cost 85 Rand for two and had a Southern Brown-throated Weaver there. Soon we saw a few Nyala, many Greater Kudu, a couple of pairs of Warthog and Burchell’s Zebra. A single Red-breasted Swallow sat along with many European Rollers and Blue-Cheeked Bee-Eaters on roadside wires, a red headed Black-collared Barbet sat in the bushes and a female Amur Falcon caused some head scratching for a while with whitish ground colour on the underside. On the road down to Mission Rocks were fine displaying short tailed male Red-shouldered Widow-birds and Pin-tailed Whydahs with pin tails this time. Mission Rocks has a loo block and a stony and very narrow beach but naught else but habitat. So drove to the Catalina Bay car park and walked out along the waterless jetty to view a flock of mostly immature Greater Flamingo and many distant large Nile Crocodiles along the water’s edge a mile away and even more distant Hippos who’s grunts carried long distance. Black-winged Stilt, 2 Avocet, White-bellied Cormorant and Fish Eagles sitting on the mud and indet larks which flew away before I could scope them, completed the picture here. Next, went to Amazibu Pan with Blue Wildebeest on the way which is a small mud-hole with yet more Hippo, a line of Yellow-wattled Lapwings, Spur-winged Geese, a Sacred Ibis and African Jacana, a singing Rattling Cisticola and a few Waterbuck. Back to the main road passed a large herd of African Buffalo.

Back at Sunset Lodge, the banded Mongoose troupe were by the brai with Ben the Jack Russell. There was a Black-bellied Glossy Starling in the bird tree, a distant African Marsh Harrier and more complaining Green-backed Camaroptera. No Hippos tonight as they were about all day not being sunburnt in the rain! At the Ski-boat club had Great & Cattle Egrets.  

Saturday 27th February 2010

On the Sunset Lodge palm stump this morning was a Golden-tailed Woodpecker and a white eyed Sombre Greenbul and an Emerald-spotted Wood Dove, on the Igwalawala Trail. Drove west, north on N2 and west again through Zulu villages to the Memorial gate of Hluhluwe Park which cost 210 Rand! There had a female Mocking Cliff-chat, a very yellow African Yellow White-eye and House Sparrow. In and soon had a covey of Helmeted Guineafowl, a singing Croaking Cisticola by the road and startled a pair of Crested Francolin up from the verge. Then for some big game with Burchell’s Zebra and four Giraffe and the first of many displaying long black tailed Red-collared Widowbirds. By a lake found an Ashy Flycatcher, a flock of Common Waxbill and a Spotted Flycatcher. On up to Hilltop camp which was swathed in cloud where Ros had coffee and I chased a Southern Boubou through the mist but did see well a Grey Sunbird and a pair of Yellow-throated Longclaw. Onwards south and at Sivivaneni, the road was blocked by a bull elephant so back tracking found another female Amur Falcon and passed the offending pachyderm on the second attempt. A pale billed black finch on the roadside was a Dusky Indigobird. Stopped for picnic at Siwasamakhosikazi cliffs with our first Cape Griffon Vultures over and a few Lesser Striped Swallows. The dung beetles were rolling the elephant dung along the roads and an Angulate Tortoise tried to get squashed. A Flappet Lark was easy to identify as were the many Zitting Cisticola and a sinuate shape across the road was a probable Slender Mongoose.

 

Road hogging Elephant, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10               White Rhino, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10

We moved under the road bridge into Mfolozi Park and soon had quite a few short tailed black White-winged Widow-birds but noted the yellow shoulders more than any white. Next was a huge and ferocious looking male Chacma Baboon sitting with a female in a small tree and had herds of graceful Impala.  At Impila Camp there was only a small shop selling cold drink so Ros had to make do whilst I walked the gardens, always the best place to see people-conditioned birds. First was a Blue-breasted Cordonbleu, two pairs of Mocking Cliff-chats, a flock of Red-winged Starlings’ a male then a female Violet-backed Starling, a single Crested Barbet, a Yellow-throated Petronia, House Sparrow, Willow Warbler and a Yellow-bellied Greenbul. Retracing our drive back we found a single White Rhino briefly near the road before re-entering Hluhluwe Park and more Black-bellied Glossy Starlings and Yellow-fronted Canaries and a pair of Lilac-breasted Roller. Another driver coming the other way directed us off on a dirt road west toward Seme and we found the 1 lioness sitting in the shade under dense bushes and very close to the road with half a dozen other vehicles jockeying for a view! Soon after stopped near Thiyeni for a superb and odd looking Bateleur flyover.  Found another three and then one more White Rhino.

Impala,             Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10                                          Warthog, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10

Sunday 28th February 2010

Up at dawn at 5.30 to walk the Igwalawala Trail and finally nailed the croaker as a superb Livingstone's Turaco. A spotless small brown dove in the leaf litter was a Lemon Dove and a pack of noisy Terrestrial Brownbuls were easy as was the single Black Saw-wing and a Honey Buzzard flying over. At Sunset Lodge there was a single Bushbuck in the garden and an amazing Purple-crested Turaco croaking in the umbrella pine tree behind the shalet, In town, whilst Ros emailed etc I watched and behind fruit stalls along McKenzie Street were a flock of Bronzed Mannikins, another  Black Saw-wing and yet more Lesser Striped Swallows. Drove to the Main Beach car park with Euro Rollers (sounds like the lottery), Blue cheeks and a pair of Broad Billed Rollers on the way. Sat in the sun on the beach and scoped the Cape Wagtails, yellow fronted Canaries and a single immature Cape Gannet out at sea. Lunch at the Ski-boat Club (the ski boats now have to be trailored over the beach to be launched) with two Hammerkop new to the list. Talked with our Sunset Lodge host Rodney (a member one of the three founding white families of St Lucia) over a Castle Stout about how the estuary is now a land locked and fresher lagoon which suits the Hippos more than before, hence they are now so easy to see from the Club. After walked Igwalawala Trail again and had Black-backed Puffback, the only Rudd's Apalis of the trip and fork tailed Drongo. I also found a snake which reacted aggressively when I tugged its tail, arching a bit like a black mamba but probably was only an Olive whip-snake. Took the 4pm hippo boat trip with Steve from the town quay with a Wahleberg Eagle over, a Purple Swamp-hen, lots more marsh stuff seen before and loads of Hippos including the one eared Vincent (van Gough), a single flying Giant Kingfisher and photod the local Fish Eagle. We had an excellent Seafood platter at the Ocean Basket restaurant.

 

Bin raiding Banded Mongeese, St Lucia, 26.ii.10              Hippos, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10

Monday 1st March 2010

Two Livingstone Turacos calling in Sunset lodge garden this morning. Drove north through St Lucia Park again and at the entrance was a female Marico Sunbird identified after much careful thought and a single Blue Duicer was the only one of the trip. On the roadside wires were a number of pairs of Brown-hooded Kingfisher and sunning in roadside bushes were 2 Burchell’s Coucals and a few tree top Dark-backed Weaver were added to the list. At Catalina Bay were two very distant but welcome Saddle-billed Storks and later a single Long-crested Eagle on a telegraph pole. At Cape Vidal there are very few amenities, loos and a very rudimentary shop only so come prepared! Ros sat in the sun again on the beautiful and empty beach whilst I explored the pines and trees growing on the sand dunes and found the rare Samango Monkeys, another Olive whip-snake on the sand and a small squirrel led me a dance and proved to be a noisy Red-bellied Coast Squirrel. Noisy and colourful sunbirds in the sand-dune pines were Purple-banded Sunbirds and there were a few Red-backed Mannikins, one collecting nest material and there were singing Willow Warblers. Took the grassland loop back past Lake Bhangazi with hippos, Dikkops, Spur-winged Geese etc., a pale Wahlbergs Eagle on a bush and a flock of Red-breasted Swallows on the road and a single Southern Reedbuck?.

After a chip and Castle Lager lunch at the Quarterdeck bar, drove round to Charter’s Creek (entry fee of 20 Rand each) on the East side of St Lucia Lake opposite Catalina Bay which had absolutely nothing in the way of facilities and not a single person either! There were distant Greater Flamingos, Great White Pelicans and a single Osprey in the heat haze but little else. Back at the Ski-boat Club was a single Purple Heron and after dark back at Sunset Lodge the Hippos came to within 10 feet of where i stood on the swimming pool staging!

Amazibu Pan + Hippos, St Lucia Park, 1.iii.10                  Catalina Bay, St Lucia Lake, 1.iii.10

Tuesday 2nd March 2010

Out early in the car to the sugarloaf slipway and had two Tambourine Doves on the tarmac as well as more Collared Sunbirds, Black-collared Barbets, Dark-backed Weavers, Palm and White-rumped Swifts and a pale eyed Lesser Masked Weaver. As the sky was clouding over we decided on a two hour dash to Mkuzi Park past some imposing mountains and through the town of Mkuzi and near the entrance gate had a White-fronted Bee-eater closely followed by the first of many Common Fiscal Shrike. Entrance was cheaper at 129 Rand for two and after the rough Zulu track the internal roads were fine. Another Angulate Tortoise, more Cape Gryphon vultures and more Impala, warthog and a group of five elephant were very very close to the road and rather skittish so we drove on. A flock of wood-hoopoes were the only ones of the trip and a fine two tone vulture over, was an easy det as a White-headed Vulture. The mouse-birds moved too fast to determine unlike the Fork-tailed Drongos and a fine Golden-breasted Bunting. More Burchell’s Zebra, Blue Wildebeast, 4 + 2 Giraffe and a flock of Blue Waxbills. On to Nsumo Pan with the wind blowing the water-lily pads sideways! Two Jacanas, more hippos and a distant rookery of White-breasted and Reed Cormorants, Yellow-billed Storks, Great White and Pink-backed Pelicans. Stopped at Mantuma Camp with the usual lack of a cafe but did buy a tee-shirt and did the usual close walkabout with a pair of Chinspot Batis, a nice Yellow-breasted Apalis, Long-billed Crombec, more Purple-banded Sunbirds, a Pale Flycatcher and a pair of Golden-tailed Woodpecker.

 

Burchell’s Zebra, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10             Nyala, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10

Another two hour drive back and whilst Ros went for a massage, I walked the boardwalk to Estuary Beach with good views of Natal Robin-chat and a pair of sun birds, the male very dark below and a descending whistle the female very pale with a black tail = Neergaard's Sunbird.

Extract piece from here for Birding report for CAMPSBAYGLEN.

Wednesday 3rd March 2010 Arrival (CAMPSBAYGLEN)

Up early again with another Lemon Dove in the car-park and an adult Palm-nut Vulture over. From Sunset Lodge finally had two pairs of Yellow-billed Duck and signed out at 8am. On the Mtubatuba road found a superb African Cuckoo-hawk, sitting on a telegraph pole. Took the car back to Durban airport where they employed a guy on a quad bike with his dog and gun to scare off the Black-necked Herons. Took an internal South African Airways Airbus A319 flight SA617 to Capetown with great views of Table Mountain as we flew in. Hired another pale vivid green Chevrolet Sprint from ‘Firstcar’ again and drove off through the suburbs with many Hartlaub's Gulls everywhere, black-winged stilt and our first euro starlings of the trip. Arrived over Kloofnek into Camps Bay and Bakoven and found Camps Bay Glen which is very low key from the road. Found the keypad and liberated the set of keys to open the two gates and then the sliding steel meshes over the French windows. Met the owner Mark Schlesinger who was keen to have a birder staying there! As we spoke by the swimming pool by the stream, overlooking the sea and the twelve Apostles above saw the first Cape White-eye and a few and silent African Black Swifts overhead. Bought supplies from the local supermarket at the end of the road and tried out the Hussar Grill, which was excellent!

Thursday 4th March 2010

Up at dawn which is an hour later here at 6.30 woken by the ubiquitous calls of Hadeda Ibis flying over and sat by the swimming pool as soon had a very shy Olive Thrush, slightly less shy Cape Robin-chat, Cape Ring-necked Dove with their ‘work harder’ call and less common than the Red-eyed, laughing and Spotted Doves about. Soon got to know the common sunbird as being Southern (Lesser) Double-collared Sunbird and the also shy Southern Boubou. The resident Red-winged  Starlings were anything but shy. Distant at sea were dolphins, and cormorants but too far away to identify and immature Cape Gannet. Later on Camps Bay Beach, watched two immature cormorants on a close boulder which were probably Crowned Cormorant as they were not associating with the large numbers of more vertically standing and sociable Cape Cormorant, further out. With the latter were three African Black Oystercatchers and a flock of Swift and Sandwich Terns.  Back at Bakoven, a Cicada regularly flew around singing as it flew!  Watched the sunset and at the last moment watched the ‘green flash’ over 10 seconds as a single spot or at one point a row of beads along the top edge of the vanishing disk!

Friday 5th March 2010

This morning the twelve apostles were shrouded in mist so not a day to sun oneself. Found a single female Malachite Sunbird on wires just up the road. Drove into Victoria seafront but the Robben Island boat was fully booked so we booked for the following Tuesday with many Harlaub’s Gulls under foot! We drove on north through the dull weather along R27 Marine Drive to the large Rietvlei lagoons and stopped in the road works to scope a pair of European Shelduck! Spur-winged and Egyptian Geese, White-breasted and Reed Cormorants and Pink-backed Pelicans. At the west turn off on the M14, the reed fringed pools held lots of Red-knobbed Coots, a few Cape Shoveler, Moorhen, Mallard and Stilts. Onwards to the atomic power station at Koebergand we had to sign in at security first. In the coastal scrub were Cape Bulbul, Cape Robin-chat, and on the power cables a loan male Lesser Kestrel and a Black-shouldered Kite. Then scoped a Fiscal Shrike and a Grey-backed Cisticola on a bush top. Further north the sky cleared and back on the R27, the Langebaan road, saw a running Smith's Red Rock-hare, groups of African Pied Starling, a single female/immature Ostrich and the first of many Karoo Prinias. We turned off on the Yzerfontein road and followed a sign to the Gypsum works to the north and followed a lorry in. At the works we asked permission from the office and walked in by the salt pans and soon found a small group of Kittlitz's Plovers with a single male Chestnut-banded Plover. Back to the road and on the edge of Yzerfontein as we avoided a manic lorry driver, a movement caught my eye and a male and two female / immature Southern Black Korhaan were well watched close to the road! Into the coastal holiday resort of Yzerfontein and found an open cafe with an all dark Plain Martin overhead, Black Oystercatchers and Blacksmith Plover on the beach, lots of cormorants distant and under our feet were House Sparrows and a Cape Wagtail. On North with more Ostrich, to the West Coast National Park with a 40 Rand entry fee each to get in and went round to the Atlantic view point with nothing but a Rock Kestrel over the sand dunes (is it the same species as ours?) Round to the Dutch Geelbek Manor and parked up with a restaurant and a noisy generator. Ros sat in the sun and around the farm were a covey of Cape Francolin, a colony of Cape Weavers, Cape Robin-chat & Fiscal Shrike. Out on the salt marsh were a pack of Yellow Canary and from the lagoon hide were Greater Flamingo, Grey Plover, Whimbrel, Curlew Sandpipers, Greenshank, Sacred Ibis, African Spoonbill, Anhinga and Ringed Plover. Then walking inland with a pair Cape Sparrow, a male Bontebok looking nervous and moving away, lots of very nervous Ostrich galloping away, a single Cape Grysbok spooked and away very fast, 1 African Hoopoe, closely inspected African (Grassvelt) Pipits and two pairs of Orange-throated Longclaw. Ran out of time and the hide I could not find as the signs were not good enough.  On leaving had the only Alpine Swift of the trip over.  Back at the atomic power station at Koeberg, noticed the first of many Steppe Buzzard, a covey of Cape Francolin and a fine male Springbok chewing the cud by the station entrance. Perfect views of Table Mountain coming back south into Capetown. A big disappointment was the cancellation of the long looked forward to, pelagic trip tomorrow out from Simonstown due to the strong South Easterly wind and there being no fishing boats out there.

Saturday 6th March 2010

Moved out early south along the peninsular to Simonstown where on roadside wires was a single White-throated Swallow as we sat in a traffic jam waiting to enter a Navy Day. Through and parked at Boulders Beach and soon had pairs of Jackass Penguin along the back path to Foxy Beach where the beach is reserved for the colony and a few well grown chicks present. Along the boardwalk were more Southern (Lesser) Double-collared Sunbird and many distant Cape Cormorant on the rocks. On Boulder beach proper the penguins were mixing with the bathers. Moved on south to the Cape of Good Hope Park (entry fee of 75 Rand each) and the lower car park with a party of 5 Ostrich and a pack of 100+ Swift Terns on the rocks plus many passing Cape Gannets and White-breasted & Cape Cormorants. Dropped Ros off at Buffelsfontein info centre and parked up in Cape point car park. Lots of mist, tourists, buses and Red-winged Starlings and House Sparrows but near the top lighthouse had a group of Cape Siskins with white points on the primaries, a fine Cape Bunting and a photogenic Cape Hyrax posing and a team of Four-striped Grass Mice being fed by the tourists. Down at Buffels Bay were a squadron of Cape gulls and another 100+ Swift terns. Back at the Buffelsfontein info centre was a male Helmeted Guineafowl, a pair of distant Bontebok in the sand dunes, an aggressive Chakma Baboon and a tame Fiscal Shrike. Back via the sand dunes and white sand beach at Plaatboom beach with a single White-fronted Plover and on to the cliffs at Gifkommetje with more Swift Terns and Cape Cormorants. Back via Scarborough cliffs with a single White-necked Raven flying overhead. Back at Bakoven sampled the delights of Springbok and Ostrich at the Hussar Grill, first see your lifers and then eat them!

 

Cape Rock Hyrax, Cape Point, 6.iii.10                      Cape Fur Seal, V.&A. Harbour, Capetown, 9.iii.10

Sunday 7th March 2010

Went down to the elephantine Bakoven Rocks and soon discovered the breeding ungainly and white eyed and rumped Bank Cormorants with many more smaller Capes and a rather out of place Cape Robin-chat!. On to the Cable Car and went up Table Mountain on the first car of the day at 8.10 am and with the panoramic views had three Rock Kestrels and three Rock Martins over. By the centre was a very tame Familiar Chat flicking its wings but nothing else.

  

Intaka Island, Capetown, 7.iii.10                          Buffels Bay, Cape Point, 6.iii.10

Out north again on the N1 to the shopping centre at Intaka Island with a boat trip which was more for those who wished to buy accommodation in Century City! Lots of Crested Coots & Egyptian Geese. Back into the Intaka proper soon had a male Southern Red Bishop coming out of breeding plumage, Common Waxbills, Karoo Prinia, Sacred Ibis, Reed & White-breasted Cormorants. New to the list were 2 pairs of Red-billed Teal and a single Greater Striped Swallow with Plain and White Throated Swallows over. On the lagoon were one pair of Cape Soveller, 2 Glossy Ibis, Blacksmith Plover, Pied Kingfisher and a Great Crested Grebe! North to Paarl on the N1 and found the Huguenot winery at Laborie in business since 1691 and in period Dutch buildings. There we tasted four red and four white wines. Suitably fortified we found north of town off Drommedaris Street, the beautiful yet smelly Sewage works, where the temperature was 40 degrees Centigrade! On the first pool working clockwise round the complex from the entrance security point had African Reed Warbler, Little Grebes, Cape Sparrow and a pack of White-throated Swallows panting in the shade with a few more Plain Swallows. Lots of flies but also on the main lakes were lots of Cape Teal, Blacksmiths, Crested Coot, White-winged Black Terns coming into summer plumage, Reed and White-breasted Cormorants, 2 Greater Flamingos, Yellow & Red Billed Teals and two Hottentot Teal! Also there were Marsh and Common Sandpipers and Sacred Ibis and Cattle Egrets sheltering in the shade of some large tanks.

Monday 8th March 2010

Up early before daybreak alone and through town with the only Cape Crows of the trip over the townships of Capetown. Parked on the outside bend lay-by on the main N2 road at Sir Lowry Pass with a Familiar Chat by the car and two White-necked Ravens raiding the bins there. I crossed the busy road and walked East below the ridge with Orange-breasted Sunbirds, Cape Siskins and a Lanner Falcon flying away. Climbed the col to the rusting and neglected signal cannons with two Pied Crows and a single male Sentinel Rock Thrush, a Cape Sugarbird and another Cape Robin-chat on the way back but no sign of any Rock Jumpers! I took the False Bay coast road back to Capetown and found Strandfontein Road and off that, Zeekoevlei Road to Strandfontein Sewage works through a security point and soon found the best wetland so far! With a pair of rare Chaffinch, many Avocet, many quite pink Greater Flamingo, Purple Swamphen, African Marsh Harrier, Sacred, Hadada & Glossy Ibis, Stilt, Little Grebe, Plain Martin, Common Waxbill, Marsh Sandpiper, Grey & Black-necked Herons,  Spur-winged & Egyptian Geese, all the other duck as seen at Paarl and Intaka. Two Black Oystercatcher and a number of Levaillant’s Cisticola and African Reed warblers were seen well. Almost got bogged down in sand on the seaward side tracks but got through and across the road went a Cape Grey Mongoose and more Grassveld Pipits and Orange-throated Longclaws.

In the afternoon, after another wine tasting at Groot Constansia winery, we went to Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, costing 35 Rand each for entry and settled Ros in a sunny seat with flocks of tame Cape Spurfowl, Helmeted Guineafowl and Egyptian Geese, and went off searching. There were more Olive Thrush, Southern Boubou, Lesser Double-banded & Orange-breasted Sunbirds and two little African Dusky Flycatchers and another run-by by a Cape Grey Mongoose.

 

Tuesday 9th March 2010

This morning the twelve apostles were hidden in the fog. We parked again in the clock-tower at Victoria Waterfront and for 200 Rand each, caught the old ferry ‘Susan Kruger’ out to Robben Island at 9am. Through the thinning fog with many dolphins with re-curved dorsal fins, blunt noses and a hint of flank colour and striped. Quite a number of packs of feeding penguins, cape gannets, a single large dark shearwater with bowed wings and a pale bill which was a White-chinned Petrel and a dark phase Arctic Skua harrying the Hartlaub’s Gulls, Sandwich and Swift Terns. Robben Island harbour breakwaters was packed with thousands of Cormorants with many Bank’s and finally a few adult Cresteds! A Coach trip round the island revealed more Black Oystercatchers, penguins, Sacred Ibis, Little Egret and Helmeted Guineafowl. In the prison courtyard were Cape Wagtail and the sound of the nesting colony and the odd flyover by Hartlaub’s Gulls. On the return trip, the fog cleared to reveal the table and a single quite pale Cory’s Shearwater. Back in the Victoria & Albert Harbour, there were several Cape Fur Seals sunning themselves.

 

Cormorants, Robben Island, 9.iii.10                                 Camps Bay Glen, Bakoven, 4.iii.10

Wednesday 10th March 2010

This was the last day and returned to Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens for another try for a number of birds that I had failed to see, a risk when you don’t or cannot afford to use local guides) so saw more Cape Sugarbirds, Orange-breasted Sunbirds, a Black Saw-wing, a couple of White-naped Ravens very high up the side of Table Mountain and a well viewed sparrowhawk flying below was a Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk. All the canaries proved to be Yellow Canaries and the eagle owls were probably scared away by the Cliff Richard concert held there last night! Then there was a thunderstorm so had to come down and got wet but the rain was warm. Boarded the Emirates Boeing 777 at 6pm and apart from Laughing Doves at Dubai the morning after and a flight on the new Emirates Airbus A380, this ended the trip.

 

 

 

The Bird List: Underlined being new to my life list, Kwazulu Natal in Red, Capetown area in Blue. We missed a number of common and hoped for species but then we did not pay for a local guide or use lure tape recordings at any time.

1.    Ostrich, Struthio camelus, none in Natal. 1 on road between Koeberg & Langebaan, and many and nervous near Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; 5 near Cape of Good Hope, 6.iii.10.

 

  

Ostrich, Langebaan, 5.iii.10                                            Jackass Penguin, Boulders Beach, 6.iii.10 

 

2.    Jackass Penguin, Spheniscus demersus, colony of c.80, some in the bushes and some with a few chicks on Foxy Beach and mixing with bathers on Boulders Beach, 6.iii.10; from ferry to and on Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

3.    Little Grebe, Tachybaptus ruficollis, 10 at Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10.

4.    Great Crested Grebe, Podiceps cristatus, Intaka Island, 7.iii.10.

5.    White-chinned Petrel, Procellaria aequinoctialis, 1 from ferry to Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

6.    Cory's Shearwater, Calonectris diomedea, 1 from ferry to Robben Island, 9.iii.10

7.    Great White Pelican, Pelecanus onocrotalus, Charter’s Creek, St Lucia Estuary, 1.iii.10; Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10;  Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

8.    Pink-backed Pelican, Pelecanus rufescens, 1 Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; Charter’s Creek, St Lucia Estuary, 1.iii.10; many at Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10; Rietvlei, Capetown 5.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10.

9.    Cape Gannet, Morus capensis, 1 distant immature off beach St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10; 1 immature distant from Camps Bay Glen garden, Capetown 4.iii.10; passing Cape of Good Hope, 6.iii.10; from ferry to Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

10. White-breasted Cormorant, Phalacrocorax (carbo) lucidus, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; Catalina Bay, St Lucia park 26.ii.10; Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10; Cape of Good Hope, 6.iii.10; Intaka Island 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10.

11. Cape Cormorant, Phalacrocorax capensis, large numbers distant from Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven and Camps Bay beach, 4.iii.10; rocks off Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10; off Boulders Beach & off Cape of Good Hope, 6.iii.10; nesting colony on Bakoven Rocks, 7.iii.10; Robben Island harbour, 9.iii.10; by far the commonest cormorant around the Cape shoreline.

12. Bank Cormorant, Phalacrocorax neglectus, nesting colony on Bakoven Rocks, 7.iii.10; Robben Island harbour, 9.iii.10.

13. Long-tailed Cormorant, Phalacrocorax africanus, Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10; Rietvlei, Capetown 5.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10.

14. Crowned Cormorant, Phalacrocorax coronatus, 2 immatures on rocks close to Camps Bay beach, 4.iii.10; a few in Robben Island harbour, 9.iii.10.

15. African Darter, Anhinga rufa, Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

16. Grey Heron, Ardea cinerea, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and every day; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10, the commonest heron.

17. Black-headed Heron, Ardea melanocephala, 1 Durban airport 24.ii.10 and 5 scared by scarer and dog there 3.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10.

18. Goliath Heron, Ardea goliath, Distant from Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary 25.ii.10 and every day and at the Ski Boat Club.

19. Purple Heron, Ardea purpurea, 1 Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 1.iii.10; Intaka Island 7.iii.10.

20. Great Egret, Ardea alba, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10.

21. Little Egret, Egretta garzetta, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; Robben Island 9.iii.10.

22. Cattle Egret, Bubulcus ibis, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; sheltering from the sun by the tanks at Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10.

23. Hamerkop, Scopus umbretta, 2 Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 28.ii.10.

24. Yellow-billed Stork, Mycteria ibis, St Lucia Estuary 25.ii.10, every day at the Ski Boat Club; Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

25. Woolly-necked Stork, Ciconia episcopus, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary 28.ii.10.

26. Saddle-billed Stork, Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis, 2 distant at Catalina Bay, St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

27. Sacred Ibis, Threskiornis aethiopicus, Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10; Intaka Island 7.iii.10; sheltering from the sun by the tanks at Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10; Robben Island 9.iii.10.

28. Hadeda Ibis, Bostrychia hagedash, Widespread and obvious! Durban 24.ii.10; in seaside gardens at Umdoloti 25.ii.10; in the tree at Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary & every day; Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 & every morning & evening; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10; Widespread and obvious.

29. Glossy Ibis, Plegadis falcinellus, 2 Intaka Island 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10.

30. African Spoonbill, Platalea alba, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

 

 

 

31. Greater Flamingo, Phoenicopterus roseus, mostly immature at Catalina Bay, St Lucia park 26.ii.10; Charter’s Creek, St Lucia Estuary, 1.iii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10; 2 at Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10; many adults at Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

32. White-faced Whistling Duck, Dendrocygna viduata, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

33. Egyptian Goose, Alopochen aegyptiacus, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and every day; St Lucia Estuary boat trip, 28.ii.10; many Rietvlei, Capetown 5.iii.10; Intaka Island 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10. very common.

34. Common Shelduck, Tadorna tadorna, 2 Rietvlei lagoons, Capetown 5.iii.10, presumably a feral pair?

35. Spur-winged Goose, Plectropterus gambensis, Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; St Lucia Estuary boat trip, 28.ii.10; Lake Bhangazi, St Lucia Park, 1.iii.10; many Rietvlei lagoons, Capetown 5.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10, common.

36. Cape Teal, Anas capensis, many at Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

37. Yellow-billed Duck, Anas undulate, 4 from Sunset Lodge St Lucia Estuary, 3.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

38. Red-billed Teal, Anas erythrorhyncha, 2 pairs Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

39. Hottentot Teal, Anas hottentota, 2 at Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10.

40. Cape Shoveler, Anas smithii, Rietvlei, Capetown 5.iii.10; 1 pair Intaka Island 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

41. Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos feral at Rietvlei, Capetown, 5.iii.10.

42. Osprey, Pandion haliaetus 1 Charter’s Creek, St Lucia Estuary, 1.iii.10.

43. African Cuckoo-hawk, Aviceda cuculoides 1 on pole by Mtuba Tuba road, 3.iii.10.

44. European Honey Buzzard, Pernis apivorus 1 over Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

45. Black-shouldered Kite, Elanus caeruleus, 1 by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10.

46. Yellow Billed Black Kite, Milvus migrans parasitus, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and every day, Camps Bay Glen the commonest raptor throughout.

47. African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus vocifer, Daily from Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10; Catalina Bay, St Lucia park, 26.ii.10.

   

Fish Eagle, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10                       Crested Guineafowl, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10

 

48. Palm-nut Vulture, Gypohierax angolensis, 1 over northern Durban 24.ii.10; 1 flyover at Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 3.iii.10.

49. Cape Griffon, Gyps coprotheres, high over Siwasamakhosikazi cliffs, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

50. White-headed Vulture, Trigonoceps occipitalis, 1 flying over Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

51. Bateleur, Terathopius ecaudatus, 1 flying over Thiyeni, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

52. African Marsh Harrier, Circus ranivorus, 1 over Durban airport 24.ii.10, first bird for South Afrika!; 1 distant from Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary 26.iii.10; 1 Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

53. Little Sparrowhawk, Accipiter minullus, 1 very wet sitting in the dead tree, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

54. Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk, Accipiter rufiventris, 1 over Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 10.iii.10.

55. Steppe Buzzard, Buteo buteo vulpinus, by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10.

56. Wahlberg's Eagle, Aquila wahlbergi, 1 over St Lucia Estuary boat trip, 28.ii.10; 1very tawny individual on bush, Lake Phangazi, St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10

57. Long-crested Eagle, Lophaetus occipitalis, 1 St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

58. Lanner Falcon, Falco biarmicus, 1 Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

59. Lesser Kestrel, Falco naumanni, 1 on power cables by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10.

60. Rock (Eurasian) Kestrel, Falco tinnunculus rupicolis, 1 hovering Langebaan sand dunes, 5.iii.10; 3 Table Mountain, 7.iii.10.

61. Amur Falcon, Falco amurensis, 1 ♀ St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; another ♀ Sivivaneni, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

62. Crested Francolin, Francolinus sephaena, 2 flushed at Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10

63. Cape Francolin, Francolinus capensis, flock at Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10.

64. Helmeted Guineafowl, Numida meleagris, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; 1 Buffelsfontein, 6.iii.10, Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10; Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

65. Crested Guineafowl, Guttera pucherani, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and most days.

66. Purple Gallinule, Porphyrio madagascariensis, 1 St Lucia Estuary boat trip, 28.ii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

67. Common Moorhen, Gallinula chloropus, many Rietvlei, Capetown, 5.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

68. Red-knobbed Coot, Fulica cristata, many Rietvlei, Capetown 5.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

69. Southern Black Korhaan Afrotis afra, 1♂ and 2 ♀ or immatures just outside Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10.

70. African Jacana, Actophilornis africanus, 2 at Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; 2 at Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

71. African Black Oystercatcher, Haematopus moquini, Camps Bay beach, 4.iii.10; Yzerfontein beach, 5.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10; Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

72. Black-winged Stilt, Himantopus himantopus, Catalina Bay, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; Capetown, 3.iii.10; Rietvlei, 5.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

73. Pied Avocet, Recurvirostra avosetta, Catalina Bay, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; many at Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

74. Water Thick-knee, Burhinus vermiculatus, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and every day; Lake Bhangazi, St Lucia Park, 1.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10.

75. Blacksmith Plover, Vanellus armatus, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; Yzerfontein beach, 5.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works 8.iii.10; very common.

76. Wattled Lapwing, Vanellus senegallus, Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10.

77. Grey Plover, Pluvialis squatarola, a few at Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

78. Ringed Plover, Charadrius hiaticula, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

79. Kittlitz's Plover, Charadrius pecuarius, 7 at Gypsum salt pans at Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10.

80. White-fronted Plover, Charadrius marginatus, 4 on the sand bar blocking St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10; 1 Platboom beach, Cape of Good Hope, 6.iii.10.

81. Chestnut-banded Plover, Charadrius pallidus, 1 at Gypsum salt pans at Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10.

82. Whimbrel, Numenius phaeopus, Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

83. Marsh Sandpiper, Tringa stagnatilis, 1 Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

84. Common Greenshank, Tringa nebularia, Umdoloti beach, 25.ii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

85. Wood Sandpiper, Tringa glareola, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

86. Common Sandpiper, Actitis hypoleucos Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10; Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10.

87. Little Stint, Calidris minuta, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

88. Curlew Sandpiper, Calidris ferruginea, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10; Langebaan lagoon, 5.iii.10.

89. Ruff, Philomachus pugnax, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

90. Arctic Skua, Stercorarius parasiticus, 1 dark phase from ferry to Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

91. Cape Gull, Larus vetula, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; a few at St Lucia Estuary; Capetown, Boulders Beach and Buffels Bay, 6.iii.10, Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

92. Grey Headed Gull Larus cirrocephalus, Umdoloti, 25.ii.10; St Lucia Estuary barrier, 25.ii.10 and every day.

93. Hartlaub's Gull, Larus hartlaubii, in the streets of Camps Bay, 3.iii.10 and every day; young being fed at Victoria & Albert dock, 5.iii.10; ferry to and all over Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

94. Caspian Tern, Hydroprogne caspia, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and every day.

95. Sandwich Tern, Sterna sandvicensis, off Camps Bay beach, 4.iii.10; ferry to Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

96. Great Crested Tern, Sterna bergii, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; off Camps Bay beach, 4.iii.10; 100+ on rocks at Cape of Good Hope; 100+ at Buffels Bay & 100+ below Gifkommetje cliffs, 6.iii.10; ferry to Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

97. Little Tern, Sternula albifrons, from Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10.

98. White-winged Black Tern, Chlidonias leucopterus, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10, flock coming into summer plumage at Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10.

99. Rock Pigeon, Columba livia, Durban airport & Capetown, 3.iii.10.

100.      Speckled Pigeon, Columba guinea, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day; urban Seapoint, 4.iii.10.

101.      Lemon Dove, Columba larvata, 1 Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10; 1 by Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 3.iii.10.

102.      Red-eyed Dove, Streptopelia semitorquata, Umdoloti 25.ii.10, Sunset Lodge St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and every day; Camps Bay Glen garden, Capetown 3.iii.10 and every day; common everywhere!

103.      Cape Ring-necked Dove, Streptopelia capicola, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day.

104.      Laughing Dove, Streptopelia senegalensis, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day.

105.      Emerald-spotted Wood Dove, Turtur chalcospilos, Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 27.ii.10.

106.      Tambourine Dove, Turtur tympanistria, 2 by Ski Boat club, St Lucia, 2.iii.10.

107.      African Green Pigeon, Treron calva, A pair at Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

108.      Livingstone's Turaco, Tauraco livingstonii, located by calls, Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10 and Sunset Lodge, 1.iii.10.

109.      Purple-crested Turaco, Tauraco porphyreolophus, located by calls, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

110.      Burchell’s Coucal, Centropus burchellii, 2 sunning themselves from Vlei Loop, St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

111.      African Palm Swift, Cypsiurus parvus, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; over Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

112.      Alpine Swift, Tachymarptis melba, 1 Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

113.      African Black Swift, Apus barbatus, Over Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 3.iii.10 and every evening.

114.      Little Swift, Apus affinis, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; large colony under St Lucia Bridge, 26.iii.10, the commonest swift.

  

Harlaub’s Gull, V.& A. Harbour, Capetown,9.iii.10 Burchell’s Coucal, St Lucia Park, 1.iii.10                        

115.      White-rumped Swift, Apus caffer, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; St Lucia Estuary; over Sugarloaf slipway, St Lucia 2.iii.10.

116.      Speckled Mousebird, Colius striatus, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

117.      Brown-hooded Kingfisher, Halcyon albiventris, St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

118.      Giant Kingfisher, Megaceryle maximus, 1 St Lucia Estuary boat trip, 28.ii.10.

119.      Pied Kingfisher, Ceryle rudis, from Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10, every day at the Ski Boat Club; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10.

120.      White-fronted Bee-eater, Merops bullockoides, 1 near entrance to Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

121.      Blue-cheeked Bee-eater, Merops persicus, Jabula Beach car-park, St Lucia Estuary 25.ii.10; main beach car park 28.ii.10; distant every day from Ski boat club.

122.      European Roller, Coracias garrulus, St Lucia Estuary Park 26.ii.10 & 28.ii.10.

123.      Lilac-breasted Roller, Coracias caudata, a pair in Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

124.      Broad-billed Roller, Eurystomus glaucurus, 2 on wires St Lucia Estuary Park, 28.ii.10.

125.      African Hoopoe, Upupa africana, 1 Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

126.      Green Woodhoopoe, Phoeniculus purpureus, a flock at Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

127.      Crowned Hornbill, Tockus alboterminatus, family party, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and daily.

128.      Trumpeter Hornbill, Ceratogymna bucinator, family party, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and daily.

129.      White-eared Barbet, Stactolaema leucotis, group of c.10 Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and daily.

130.      Yellow-rumped Tinkerbird, Pogoniulus bilineatus, daily singing on a stump in front of our shalet at Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and every day.

131.      Black-collared Barbet, Lybius torquatus, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; by  Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

132.      Crested Barbet, Trachyphonus vaillantii, 1 Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

133.      Golden-tailed Woodpecker, Campethera abingoni, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 27.ii.10; 2 Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

134.      Flappet Lark, Mirafra rufocinnamomea, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

135.      Sand Martin, Riparia riparia, distant from Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

136.      Plain Martin, Riparia paludicola, 1 all dark at Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

137.      Rock Martin, Ptyonoprogne fuligula, Table Mountain, 7.iii.10.

138.      Barn Swallow, Hirundo rustica, Durban airport 24.ii.10; St Lucia Estuary; very common everywhere.

139.      White-throated Swallow, Hirundo albigularis, 1 on roadside wires, Simons Town, 6.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; flock sitting in shade panting at Paarl sewage works, 7.iii.10.

140.      Greater Striped Swallow, Cecropis cucullata, 1 Intaka Island, 7.iii.10.

141.      Lesser Striped Swallow, Cecropis abyssinica, Umdoloti 25.ii.10, by St Lucia Bridge, 26.ii.10, Siwasamakhosikazi cliffs, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; behind fruit stalls along main street St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

142.      Red-breasted Swallow, Cecropis semirufa, 1 St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10 & a flock on the grassland loop road, 1.iii.10.

143.      Black Saw-wing Psalidoprocne holomelaena, 1 Igwalawala Trail & 1 behind fruit stalls along main street St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10; 1 Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 10.iii.10.

144.      African Pied Wagtail, Motacilla aguimp, on the roof of Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10 and daily.

145.      Cape Wagtail, Motacilla capensis, Umdoloti 25.ii.10, St Lucia Beach 28.ii.10; 1 inside cafe at Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10; inside prison compound at Robben Island, 9.iii.10.

146.      Yellow-throated Longclaw, Macronyx croceus, 2 at Hilltop camp, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

147.      Orange-throated Longclaw, Macronyx capensis, Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

148.      African (Grassvelt) Pipit, Anthus cinnamomeus, Geelbek Manor, Langebaan 5.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

149.      Black eyed Bulbul, Pycnonotus tricolor, Umdoloti 25.ii.10; Sunset Lodge St Lucia every day.

150.      Cape Bulbul, Pycnonotus capensis, Koeberg, 5.iii.10; Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10; common.

151.      Sombre Greenbul, Andropadus importunus, Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary 27.ii.10; at Memorial gate, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; by Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

152.      Yellow-bellied Greenbul, Chlorocichla flaviventris, Impila, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

153.      Terrestrial Brownbul, Phyllastrephus terrestris, Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

154.      Sentinel Rock Thrush, Monticola exploratory, 1 ♂ singing at Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

155.      Olive Thrush, Turdus olivaceus, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day, Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10.

156.      Rattling Cisticola, Cisticola chiniana, Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10.

157.      Levaillant’s Cisticola, Cisticola tinniens, Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

158.      Grey-backed Cisticola Cisticola subruficapilla, 1 singing from top of bush,  by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10.

159.      Croaking Cisticola, Cisticola natalensis, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

160.      Zitting Cisticola, Cisticola juncidis, common at Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

161.      Karoo Prinia, Prinia maculosa, on road between Koeberg & Langebaan, 5.iii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10, very common in the Cape.

162.      Tawny-flanked Prinia, Prinia subflava, at Sunset Lodge and common throughout St Lucia Estuary.

163.      Yellow-breasted Apalis, Apalis flavida, 1 at Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

164.      Rudd's Apalis, Apalis ruddi, 1 Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

165.      Green-backed Camaroptera, Camaroptera brachyura, by Ski-boat Club & Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and every day.

166.      African Reed Warbler, Acrocephalus baeticatus, Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10, Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

167.      Long-billed Crombec Sylvietta rufescens, Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

168.      Willow Warbler, Phylloscopus trochilus, 1 Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10; a few singing at Cape Vidal, 1.iii.10.

169.      Garden Warbler, Sylvia borin, 1 by Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

170.      Pale Flycatcher, Bradornis pallidus, adult feeding young at Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

171.      Southern Black Flycatcher, Melaenornis pammelaina, Jabula Beach car-park, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10; Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

172.      Spotted Flycatcher, Muscicapa striata, 1 Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; 1 Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

173.      African Dusky Flycatcher, Muscicapa adusta, 2 Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10.

174.      Ashy Flycatcher, Muscicapa caerulescens, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

175.      Natal Robin-chat Cossypha natalensis, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary 26.ii.10; from St Lucia Estuary boardwalk, 2.iii.10; shy and skulking.

176.      Cape Robin-chat, Cossypha caffra, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day; by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10; Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; Bakoven Rocks, 7.iii.10; Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

177.      Brown Scrub-robin, Cercotrichas signata, 1 Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

178.      African Stonechat, Saxicola torquata, 1 Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

179.      Familiar Chat, Cercomela familiaris, 1 Table Mountain, 7.iii.10; 2 Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

180.      Mocking Cliff-chat, Thamnolaea cinnamomeiventris, 1 at Memorial gate, Hluhluwe Park & two pairs at Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

181.      Chinspot Batis, Batis molitor, a pair at Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

182.      Collared Sunbird, Hedydipna collaris, Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary 28.ii.10; by  Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

183.      Orange-breasted Sunbird, Anthobaphes violacea, Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10, Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10 & 10.iii.10.

184.      Malachite Sunbird, Nectarinia famosa, 1 non-breeding on wires, Bakoven, 5.iii.10.

185.      Southern (Lesser) Double-collared Sunbird, Cinnyris chalybeus, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10 and every day, Boulders Beach, 6.iii.10; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10.

186.      Neergaard's Sunbird, Cinnyris neergaardi, a pair by Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

187.      Marico Sunbird, Cinnyris mariquensis, 1 streaky at entrance to St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

188.      Purple-banded Sunbird, Cinnyris bifasciatus, in beachside trees, Cape Vidal, 1.iii.10; Mantuma Camp, Mkuzi Park, 2.iii.10.

189.      Grey Sunbird, Cyanomitra veroxii, 1 at Hilltop camp, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Igwalawala Trail.

190.      African Yellow White-eye, Zosterops senegalensis, 1 Memorial gate, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

191.      Cape White-eye, Zosterops pallidus, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 3.iii.10 and every day.

192.      Cape Sugarbird, Promerops cafer, Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 10.iii.10.

193.      Red-backed Shrike, Lanius collurio, 1 ♂ Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

194.      Common Fiscal Shrike, Lanius collaris, 1 near entrance to Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10; by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10; Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; Buffelsfontein, 6.iii.10.

195.      Black-backed Puffback, Dryoscopus cubla, 1 Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

196.      Southern Boubou, Laniarius ferrugineus, 1 fleetingly at Hilltop camp, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 3.iii.10; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10.

197.      Fork-tailed Drongo, Dicrurus adsimilis, Umdoloti, 25.ii.10; Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

198.      Cape Crow, Corvus capensis, over the Capetown townships, 8.iii.10.

199.      Pied Crow, Corvus albus, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10; 2 at Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

200.      White-necked Raven, Corvus albicollis, 1 above Scarborough, 6.iii.10; 2 raiding the waste bins at Sir Lowry Pass lay by, 8.iii.10; 2 high over Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 10.iii.10.

201.      Common Myna, Acridotheres tristis, Umdoloti, 25.ii.10; Mtubatuba, 25.ii.10; Mkuzi village, 2.iii.10; common in Bakoven and urban Capetown.

202.      European Starling, Sturnus vulgaris, common in Capetown; over Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 4.iii.10.

203.      Black-bellied Glossy Starling, Lamprotornis corruscus, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 & most days; 1.iii.10; Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

204.      Violet-backed Starling, Cinnyricinclus leucogaster, 1 pair at Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

205.      African Pied Starling, Spreo bicolour, flocks on road between Koeberg & Langebaan & at Geelbek Manor, 5.iii.10.

   

Cape Wagtail, Langebaan, 5.iii.10                                   Red-winged Starling, Cape Point, 6.iii.10

 

206.      Red-winged Starling, Onychognathus morio, Umdoloti 25.ii.10, Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10, Camps Bay Glen garden, Bakoven, 3.iii.10 and every day; urban Seapoint, 4.iii.10; Cape Point, 6.iii.10; very common but not present in St Lucia.

207.      Lesser Masked Weaver, Ploceus intermedius, by Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

208.      Cape Weaver, Ploceus capensis, colony at Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

209.      African Golden Weaver, Ploceus subaureus, Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10.

210.      Southern Brown-throated Weaver, Ploceus xanthopterus, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10.

211.      Southern Masked Weaver, Ploceus velatus, Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10.

212.      Village Weaver, Ploceus cucullatus, The only colony seen at Mkuzi village, 2.iii.10.

213.      Dark-backed Weaver, Plocus bicolour, St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10; by Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 2.iii.10.

214.      Southern Red Bishop, Euplectes orix, 1 ♂ coming out of breeding plumage, Intaka Island, 7.iii.10.

215.      Red-shouldered Widowbird, Euplectes axillaris, on Mission Rocks road, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10.

216.      White-winged Widowbird, Euplectes albonotatus, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

217.      Red-collared Widowbird, Euplectes ardens, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

218.      Thick Billed Weaver, Amblyospiza albifrons, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and every day.

219.      Blue-breasted Cordonbleu, Uraeginthus angolensis, 1 Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

220.      Common Waxbill, Estrilda astrild, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Intaka Island, 7.iii.10; Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

221.      Bronze Mannikin, Spermestes cucullatus, large flock behind fruit stalls along St Lucia main street, 28.ii.10.

222.      Red-backed Mannikin Spermestes bicolour, a few in beachside trees, Cape Vidal, 1.iii.10.

223.      Dusky Indigobird, Vidua funerea, 1 ♂ Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

224.      Pin-tailed Whydah, Vidua macroura, 1 ♂ without tail, Jabula Beach car-park, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10; ♂ on Mission Rocks road, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10.

225.      Cape Bunting, Emberiza capensis, 1 Cape Point, 6.iii.10.

226.      Golden-breasted Bunting, Emberiza flaviventris, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

227.      Chaffinch, Fringilla coelebs, 1 pair Strandfontein sewage works, 8.iii.10.

228.      Yellow-fronted Canary, Serinus mozambicus, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; St Lucia Estuary beach car-park, 28.ii.10.

229.      Yellow Canary, Serinus flaviventris, small flock on saltmarsh, Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 10.iii.10.

230.      Brimstone Canary, Serinus sulphuratus, St Lucia Estuary, 25.ii.10.

231.      Cape Siskin, Pseudochloroptila totta, 2 tame pairs Cape Point, 6.iii.10; Sir Lowry Pass, 8.iii.10.

232.      House Sparrow, Passer domesticus, Memorial gate, Hluhluwe Park & Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10; Durban airport 3.iii.10; Yzerfontein, 5.iii.10.

233.      Cape Sparrow, Passer melanurus, Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; Paarl sewage works 7.iii.10.

234.      Southern Grey-headed Sparrow, Passer diffuses, Umdoloti, 25.ii.10.

235.      Yellow-throated Petronia, Petronia superciliaris, 1 Impila Camp, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10.

 

   

African Buffalo, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10                     Springbok, Koeberg, 5.iii.10       

 

MAMMAL LIST

 

1.    Vervet Monkey Cercopithecus aethiops pygerytherus, on the road from Umdoloti, 25.ii.10; Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10.

2.    Samango Monkey Cercopithecus nictitans samango, in beachside trees, Cape Vidal, 1.iii.10.

3.    Chacma Baboon Papio ursinus, Mfolozi Park & Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Cape of Good Hope & Buffelsfontein, 6.iii.10.

4.    Red-bellied Coast Squirrel Paraxerus palliates, 1 under beachside trees, Cape Vidal, 1.iii.10.

5.    Four-striped Grass Mouse Rhabdomys pumilio, very tame at Cape Point, 6.iii.10.

6.    Smith's Red Rockhare Pronolagus rupestris, 1 on road between Koeberg & Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

7.    Lion Panthera leo, 1 lioness under dense bushes very close to the road, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

8.    Cape Grey Mongoose Galerella pulverulenta, Strandfontein sewage works & Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens, 8.iii.10.

9.    Slender Mongoose Galerella sanguinea, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

10. Banded Mongoose Mungos mungo, Ski Boat club and Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10 and most days.

11. Cape Fur Seal Arctocephalus pusillus, Victoria & Albert Harbour, Capetown, 9.iii.10.

12. Cape Hyrax Procavia capensis, 1 posing for the cameras at Cape Point, 6.iii.10.

13. African Bush Elephant Loxodonta africana, 1 caused a traffic jam by feeding on the road at Sivivaneni, Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; 5 very close in Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

14. Burchell's Zebra Equus burchellii, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

15. White Rhinoceros Ceratotherium simum, 1 Mfolozi Park & 4 Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

16. Warthog Phacochoerus africanus, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

17. Hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius, eating the lawn at Sunset Lodge after dark and within 10 metres 25.ii.10 & 10 foot away on 1.iii.10!, every day from Ski Boat Club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10; distant at Catalina Bay and close at Amazibu Pan St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; many from River boat, 28.ii.10; Lake Bhangazi, St Lucia Park, 1.iii.10; Nsumo Pan, Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10

18. Giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis, 4 Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; 6 Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

19. Blue Wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus, near Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

20. Bontebok Damaliscus pygargus, 1 ♂ Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10; a pair from Buffelsfontein, 6.iii.10.

21. Springbok  Antidorcas marsupialis, 1 ♂ by atomic power station, Koeberg, 5.iii.10.

22. African Buffalo Syncerus caffer, 20+ near Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10.

23. Nyala Tragelaphus angasii, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

24. Bushbuck Tragelaphus scriptus, 1 Sunset Lodge, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10; 1 St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

25. Greater Kudu Tragelaphus strepsiceros, St Lucia Estuary Park, 26.ii.10.

26. Blue Duiker Cephalophus monticola, 1 St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

27. Red Forest Duiker Cephalophus natalensis, St Lucia Estuary town, 25.ii.10 and every day, common.

28. Cape  Grysbok Raphicerus melanotis, 1 startled from cover, Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

29. Impala Aepyceros melampus, Mfolozi Park, 27.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10.

30. Waterbuck Kobus ellipsiprymnus, Amazibu Pan, St Lucia Park, 26.ii.10; many at Catalina Bay, St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

31. Southern Reedbuck Redunca arundinum, 1 St Lucia Estuary Park, 1.iii.10.

 

REPTILE LIST

 

Angulate Tortoise Hluhluwe Park, 27.ii.10; Mkusi Park, 2.iii.10; Geelbek Manor, Langebaan, 5.iii.10.

Olive whipsnake  1 Igwalawala Trail, St Lucia Estuary, 28.ii.10; 1 Cape Vidal beach, 1.iii.10.

Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus, always a few at Ski Boat club, St Lucia Estuary, 26.ii.10, many distant at Catalina Bay, St Lucia Park 26.ii.10; many from River boat, 28.ii.10.

Hemidactylus  Geco sp 1 on the veranda at Fairhaven Guest house,  Umdoloti, 24.ii.10.

REFERENCE BOOKS

Cohan, Callan; Spottiswood, Claire & Rossouw, Jonathon; 2006. Southern African Birdfinder. Struik Publishers 456 pp.

Kingdon, Jonathan, 2004. Pocket Guide to African Mammals. A & C Black publishers, London. 272 pp.

Newman, Kenneth, 2002. Birds of Southern Africa 8th edition, Struik Publishers. 527 pp.

Sinclair Ian, Hockey Phil & Tarboton Warwick, 2002. Birds of Southern Africa 3rd edition. Struik Publishers. 447 pp.

Map Studio, Street Guide Capetown 1:20000. 14th edition, pp312.

Maps of Zululand & Maputaland Reserves, Honeyguide Publications.

 

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